This page exists as an archive of Today posts prior to 2009. Go to www.today.colostate.edu for current stories and to submit new posts.

Colorado State veterinarian receives prestigious lifetime achievement award

Dr. Stephen J. Withrow, DVM, DACVS, DACVIM receipent of the prestigious 2007 Mark L. Morris, Sr. Lifetime Achievement Award.

Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc. announced Saturday, Jan. 13, that Dr. Stephen J. Withrow, DVM, DACVS, DACVIM, received the prestigious 2007 Mark L. Morris, Sr. Lifetime Achievement Award.

This distinguished award is presented annually to a veterinarian who has made a lifetime commitment to improving the health and well-being of companion animals.

Recognized as a pioneer in his dedication to cancer research and treatment, Dr. Withrow is an internationally-acclaimed scientist and award-winning professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State University.

"Dr. Withrow's dedication to winning the battle against cancer in companion animals is an extraordinary example of the veterinary profession's commitment to making a difference for the pets of our world and the families who love them," said Mary Beth Leininger, DVM, director of Professional Affairs for Hill's and a former AVMA President. "His contributions to veterinary medicine and academic excellence are remarkable, reflecting the legacy left to the profession by Dr. Mark L. Morris, Sr."

Dr. Withrow established the largest animal cancer center in the world at CSU

Dr. Withrow established the Colorado State Animal Cancer Center, the largest animal cancer center in the world. The center has trained more veterinary oncologists than any other veterinary institution and is the only veterinary cancer group to have more than 25 consecutive years of funding from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Withrow has been a 10-year project leader for the National Cancer Institute.

As an internationally renowned expert in cancer research and treatment, Withrow's written work has been showcased in numerous textbooks and articles in peer-reviewed publications and he is credited with changing the way veterinarians treat cancer.

"With compassion, vision and unmatched dedication, he has made a tremendous impact not only on the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in companion animals, but he has also reached into human medical care," said Dr. Lance Perryman, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State.

Faculty member since 1978

Withrow joined the faculty of Colorado State in 1978 and since 2001 has served as director of the Colorado State Animal Cancer Center, holding the Stuart Chair in Oncology.

Since it was established 25 years ago, the Animal Cancer Center has grown to be the largest companion animal cancer research center in the United States, training more veterinary oncologists than any other veterinary teaching hospital in the world. Going beyond the veterinary profession, the Animal Cancer Center has an international reputation for its collaboration with human cancer institutions such as the Mayo Clinic, the National Cancer Institute and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

In addition to academic activities at Colorado State, Dr. Withrow has volunteered for more than 23 years as a counselor and fund-raiser for the Sky High Hope Camp for children with cancer, earning him the Ronald McDonald House Volunteer of the Year award in 2003.

In 2004, he was named a University Distinguished Professor. Among many contributions to cancer research and treatment, Withrow developed a limb-sparing technique to treat osteosarcoma, a malignant tumor of long bones in dogs. This technique revolutionized treatment of this disease in dogs and has been widely adopted at human cancer centers, significantly increasing the likelihood that children diagnosed with osteosarcoma will be cured, demonstrating how canine cancer research has had a far-reaching influence on human cancer care.

'Pre-eminent veterinary clinical scientist'

"The discipline of veterinary oncology as we understand it today was invented by Dr. Withrow. He may very well be the pre-eminent veterinary clinical scientist of his generation," Perryman said.

In recognition of his lifetime of service, Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc. will donate $20,000 to the Morris Animal Foundation in Dr. Withrow's name. The Morris Animal Foundation, founded in 1948, is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of companion animals and wildlife by funding humane health studies and disseminating information about these studies.

For almost six decades, Hill's has provided the most technologically advanced therapeutic and wellness foods to veterinary professionals. Hill's Prescription Diet brand offers a complete line of therapeutic pet food to nutritionally manage more than 50 disease conditions. Science Diet products are specially formulated to provide superior nutrition for a wide range of life stage and special wellness needs. To learn more about Hill's products and the company's commitment to companion animal health and the veterinary profession, call 800-548-VETS (8387) or visit http://www.hillspet.com.

Vist Dr. Withrow's faculty Web page at: http://www.cvmbs.colostate.edu/clinsci/faculty/withrow.htm.


Contact: Dell Rae Moellenberg
Email: DellRae.Moellenberg@colostate.edu
Phone Number: (970) 491-6009

Send to a Friend